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27 June 2009

Comments

Bob

Very well said! Corruption of Koranic teachings by vengeful, spiteful & ill educated Muslim clerics should be highlighted more often by journalists & politicians!!
(In another sense- See the lead article in the latest Spectator, hopefully WORDS ,in the forthcoming UK enquiry,(now fortunately in public),into the Iraq war, may (&it's a big 'may') lead to Mass Destruction of Blair! If only!!)

Noah Webster

If it makes you feel better to think that the British were "dragged" into the Iraq war by the Americans, that's fine. Fair-minded observers would say that Prime Minister Blair and his government went along quite enthusiastically.

David Eldon

Fair point, which I accept, but there is an assumption here that Prime Minister Blair was representative of the British. He and many, but not all, of his Government it would seem went blindly along believing that what they were being told was the truth. If you care to make the distinction, it sounds a little like America under Bush, perhaps?
But let's not drift away from the main point, which is that weapons (existing or otherwise) and words can have equally devastating outcomes, and it is unhealthy.

Noah Webster

Sir,

Your opening words, "Fair point, which I accept..", fooled me into thinking that you were about to graciously endorse my comment that one could hardly say that the British were "dragged" into the war in Iraq by the Americans.

Imagine my surprise, then, when you go on to write that my point (which I thought you had "accepted"!) rests on the "assumption" that Mr. Blair was representative of the British people. He was the democratically elected Prime Minister, for goodness' sake! How much more representative can you get? I really think you should concede defeat on this point!

As for your main point concerning the destructive potential of inflammatory rhetoric, we are in complete agreement. Indeed, signs of a rising tide of intolerance around the world are very troubling.

I enjoy your blog very much and always look forward to the next instalment. Thank you for writing it.

David Eldon

I do not usually respond to individual points of view, because many people have differing opinions - many of which are valid, depending on the angle one approaches it from. However ... one of the problems of democratic elections is that they are not always reflective of the popular vote. Mr Ahmadinejad was democratically elected, so we are led to believe, like Mr. Mugabe! In reverse, we have the tragedy of Ms Aung San Suu Kyi who was democratically elected.
In the case of Mr Blair, I recall that the Conservative Party in that election actually polled more votes in total than Mr Blair's Labour party, but the result rested on the number of seats won. The democratic process does have its flaws I think - but then there is probably no "perfect" system.
Rather than graciously endorse your comment, may I nevertheless graciously acknowledge your point of view and thank you for your generous comments about my blog?

Noah Webster

Sir,

Accepted!

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